March 20, 2010

Doctocracy: Paul Offit, Vaccine Millionaire, Wants Coerced Vaccination and Re-education Camps, I Mean, Vaccine Classes

“Offit suggests one way to raise vaccination rates is to make it harder for people not to get themselves or their children vaccinated. This could mean, for example, attending educational classes that teach the public what the safety profiles of different vaccines are, before they are allowed to opt out of vaccination. “You have to convince people that a choice not to get a vaccine is not a risk-free choice; it’s just a choice to take a different risk.” ”
- The Lancet

Vaccination is down. For Offit, that means a loss in future profits on his vaccine patents. The solution? Make people sit though vaccine propaganda lectures (complete with pictures of children with horrible rashes and in polio wards, I am sure) before they are ALLOWED not to vaccinate.

Because, you see, your body belongs to the government and you need their permission NOT to put mercury, aluminum, foreign DNA and viruses it in. After all, having a body, is like driving a car, you should have to take classes and pass an exam in order to use it... it is a privilege.


A few months ago I heard a very accomplished physician, bemoaning the bias and pressure tactics at work in his own profession, refer to the public health power grab that is happening as a growing "Doctocracy". That immediately popped to mind when I read Offit's new ideas.

"Public Health" has gotten way out of hand. Doctors have always been accused of having a God complex, but few would actually go as far as suggesting that you legally need permission from them to exercise informed consent on whether or not you should take a pharmaceutical.

So if the health care bill passes, will they try to make full vaccination mandatory before you can access your health care coverage? Will only AAP member doctors be covered, and will AAP only allow docs that make their patients vaccinate according to the CDC schedule? Maryland already sent out letters to parents saying that they may be subject to imprisonment and child protective services intervention if they didn't vaccinate (and conveniently left out that Maryland is a philosophical exemption state and all they had to do what sign a form to be 'legal').

Now Offit has said, and Lancet has printed, that vaccines uptake should be coerced, so if this idea is accepted, what other methods of coercion will they come up with?

Say no to forced and coerced vaccination at the The American Rally for Personal Rights. Enough is enough.

The Lancet, Volume 375, Issue 9719, Pages 970 – 971, 20 March 2010

Experts concerned about vaccination backlash
Priya Shetty

Public health professionals are worried about the increasingly vocal anti-vaccination lobby in the USA and other western countries and their effect on immunisations globally. Priya Shetty reports.

Vaccination was one of the greatest public health achievements of the 20th century. Its success might now be its undoing, however. Around the world, vaccination rates are dropping, and the unthinkable is happening: children are dying from childhood diseases like measles and pertussis.

This fall in immunisation has coincided with an increasingly vocal anti-vaccination movement. Public health now seems more at threat than ever by anti-vaccination messages, and the reluctance to vaccinate has been affecting rates of uptake for other vaccines such as that for influenza A H1N1. Health experts are now faced with the daunting challenge of fighting these groups.

Anti-vaccination groups have been around for as long as the practice of vaccination has. Arguably, health watchdogs and critics are a vital part of checks and balances on the medical industry. But scientists are starting to become increasingly concerned about the medical misinformation that some groups are spreading.

Organisations such as the US National Vaccine Information Centre (NVIC), the Coalition for SafeMinds, and Know Vaccines, either oppose universal vaccination (on the basis that “all children are different”) or emphasise the parents’ right to choose whether their children are vaccinated. In a statement on the website of the NVIC, one of the biggest groups in the USA, its co-founder Barbara Loe Fisher says: “If the State can tag, track down and force citizens against their will to be injected with biologicals of unknown toxicity today, there will be no limit on which individual freedoms the State can take away in the name of the greater good tomorrow.”

Many groups use as ammunition alleged links between vaccines and diseases such as autism, diabetes, or multiple sclerosis. “At the heart of the anti-vaccine movement is the notion that we are merely substituting infectious diseases with chronic diseases”, says Paul Offit, chief of infectious diseases at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA, USA, and co-inventor of the rotavirus vaccine.

Offit is one of several scientists who told The Lancet that anti-vaccination groups are unequivocally threatening public health, the evidence of which is the re-emergence of diseases that medical science had once beaten. “In 2008, we had a measles epidemic in the USA that was bigger than anything we had had in a decade, and that epidemic owed directly to the fact that some children had not been vaccinated. The parents were more afraid of the vaccine than they were of the disease, as a direct result of misinformation by anti-vaccine websites”, says Offit. Recent outbreaks of pertussis and haemophilus influenza B in undervaccinated communities in parts of the USA have resembled outbreaks from the prevaccine era, he says.

The geographical spread of people who refuse to vaccinate is important, says Saad Omer, assistant professor of global health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. If these people are uniformly spread out across an area, then the herd immunity stays intact. “However, our group and others have shown that vaccine refusal clusters geographically (and perhaps in social networks). Anti-vaccination groups often ‘think globally but act locally.’ Therefore, even if only ten of 100 people refuse vaccines but most of them live in the same neighbourhood, the likelihood of outbreaks increases due to local breakdown of herd immunity”, says Omer.

The movement has tended to be most active against childhood vaccines, with the most forceful rhetoric coming from parents who say that they do not want to expose their children to “unnecessary toxins”. One in eight American parents has refused at least one vaccine recommended for their children by their family doctor, according to a study published in Pediatrics this month, which surveyed more than 1500 parents of children aged 17 years or younger. But the reluctance to vaccinate is now permeating other areas of health.

According to the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID), anti-vaccination messages have partly been responsible for the poor uptake of the H1N1 vaccine. As each influenza season progresses, “we don’t know whether the virus will stay the same”, says Giuseppe Cornaglia, former president of ESCMID, now at the Department of Pathology, University of Verona, Italy. “Because many people who could have been immunised haven’t had the vaccine, we are going to be starting from scratch”, he says.

Anti-vaccination groups have also affected the way governments responded to the pandemic, says Tevi Troy, the previous Deputy Secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services. “The US decision not to use adjuvants, which effectively expands the supply of the vaccines, stemmed in part from concerns about how the anti-vaccine groups would have reacted to adjuvants. This could have been a problem had the H1N1 outbreak been more severe”, he says.

However ludicrous some of the anti-vaccination messages might seem to scientists, it is hard to deny that they do hold some traction with the public. Complacency about infectious diseases in the developed world, born out of the enormous success of vaccination, might be one explanation. “As the rate of illness goes down, and people mostly encounter real or perceived vaccine associated adverse events (instead of disease), there is a change in mental calculus in terms of benefit versus risk of vaccines”, says Omer.

The internet, and the forums and social networking sites it has spawned, has allowed anti-vaccination advocacy and influence to permeate deeper than ever. For example, says Omer, “a few years ago, vaccine-related rumours would be restricted to certain (mostly developed) countries. However, now a viral video made by a vaccine opponent in California can end up being discussed in an Indian web forum.”

The increase in anti-vaccination advocacy dovetails with a growing public mistrust of science that in recent years has manifested against genetically modified food, stem cells, and, most recently, climate change.

At last month’s yearly meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Ralph Cicerone, president of the US National Academy of Sciences, told delegates that recent controversies over climate change had damaged public faith in science. “There has been a widespread deterioration in the public’s attitude to science not only in the US but in many other countries in the past 3 months”, said Cicerone.

Against this background, global health experts are trying to ensure that people in developing countries can access life-saving vaccines.

Does anti-vaccination advocacy exist in these countries? “Unfortunately yes”, says Omer. “However, they are relatively less organised. Often there are entities that are organised for a different reason but end up providing a platform for opposing vaccines eg, religious and political groups in Nigeria.”

ESCMID’s Cornaglia says he is “seriously scared” about the prospect that anti-vaccination groups will take hold in the developing world. “Vaccines are the best weapon we have for the future.”

Not everyone shares this view. Offit still believes that there is much more public appreciation of vaccines in the developing world. Offit remembers taking the rotavirus vaccine to Nicaragua, and says “it was remarkable how happy people were to get a vaccine to prevent a common cause of diarrhoea and dehydration, and, at least in the developing world, death.”

Cornaglia was ESCMID’s communication officer at one time, and he believes that health agencies such as ESCMID and WHO “have to change their communication style”. “They have to address public health professionals like physicians and nurses, because if we don’t convince them, then we cannot convince the lay public at all”, he says.

“Public-health messages should be simple, honest and straightforward.” Sending a clear message, however scientifically erroneous it might be, is how the anti-vaccination movement scored big with H1N1, he says. Their message was simply: “vaccines are the devil”.

The anti-vaccination lobby has become so highly organised, says Adam Finn, professor of paediatrics at the University of Bristol, UK, that “they do pose a threat and need to be taken seriously. NVIC in the USA now has a yearly conference and is becoming a kind of institution…They are not amateurs—they are making careers out of this.”

Like Cornaglia, Finn says that the anti-vaccination lobby’s communication skills have a lot to do with their influence. “They, unlike most doctors and scientists, are always willing to talk to the media and are good at doing it.”

Offit suggests one way to raise vaccination rates is to make it harder for people not to get themselves or their children vaccinated. This could mean, for example, attending educational classes that teach the public what the safety profiles of different vaccines are, before they are allowed to opt out of vaccination. “You have to convince people that a choice not to get a vaccine is not a risk-free choice; it’s just a choice to take a different risk.”



BlogStalker said...

Yup, I'll take that other risk. At least, in time for my second child.


kto said...

Loss of profit? Shrinking wallets for the vaccine producers and promoters...that is what this is all about.
Health Threat? Health treat is evident after vaccines are given to children and adults..permanently.
Education? Parents today are questioning and researching vaccines before they are administered to their children....Parents today are alot smarter than given credit to...Let's face it, the vaccine producers and promoters only care about their bottom line shrinking...not the health of a human being.

Sonja said...

Before I take a class on vaccine risk, you do a study on the un-vaccinated population. When I have that data in front of me then I will weigh the risk!

Rory said...

There should be no medical insurance when parents refuse to vaccinate their kids. The parents should have to pay the funeral costs too.

Half a century ago I had German Measles any parent who deliberately puts their kid through that doesn't deserve kids.

Sonja said...

Hey Rory, guess what...there is no medical insurance for those kids injured by a vaccine! You know...the ones who were vaccinated! Have you spent time with a child suffering severe medical complications from a vaccine? My guess would be no. You seem to have recovered...these kids often do not. I will take your German Measles over vaccine damage any day of the week. Oh and guess what...these kids are dying and yes we do pay for the funeral costs! Get with reality.

Stan said...

Please stop and think. This is about safer vaccines. This is about truth-telling, regarding the REAL info on risks vs. benefits - the WHOLE story about a particular vaccine's risks. This is about the parents' right to informed consent for a medical procedure practiced on their child.
The public has been lied to regarding the truth about vaccines for decades. Parents are smarter now; unfortunately, from sad experience. They are mad as hell and won't take arrogance for an answer any longer.
It's long past time for honesty to prevail in this matter. Not dogmatism.

Minority said...

Is the only possible reply when people express concerns about vaccines: "your children will die of terrible diseases, you scum!"

How about nicely asking someone: "Why does vaccination concern you? Have you had a bad experience?"

Get a conversation going. Find out what is really going on before you start with the death threats.

Ginger Taylor said...

"Half a century ago I had German Measles"

...and yet you live to comment on my post.

Miguel said...

Less than 2% of American adults are up-to-date on their CDC recommended much for the herd immunity argument.

Sonja said...

Actually, it is the ones that do not vaccinate that are the healthiest. This is why they will not do the damn study that would have ended this 20+ years ago.

gavpedz said...

Hi i am Gavin Pedley, i have created a Autism Awareness video and would love it if you could post this on your site for April Autism awareness month?
Autism effects me both at home and at works as i have a son with Autism and also have worked in the field for over 5 years.
I would be very great full if you could post my video

Kind regards
Gavin Pedley

Mylinda said...

So maybe I don't understand. You don't give your child ANY vaccines? I thought some people didn't take any vaccines, some people took vaccines but without the thermosol and spread out over a longer period, and some people did take vaccines.

Ginger Taylor said...


I don't vaccinate my kids any more, but they were both being vaccinated according to the schedule when my younger son regressed six years ago.

Since then I have allowed my older son to have two additional shots, but we won't be doing any more.

And if I had another baby (which is not in the plans) I would not vaccinate at all, but would take a much different approach to health all together.

Bottom line, as you outlined in your comment, people need to make their own vaccine choices, and not be pushed or coerced.

altoids said...

The current vaccine/autism research has been like this obese lady.

She eats pies, cakes, cookies, ice cream, and candies. She give us eating peanut-butter fudge. Then she moans and groans. She has proven over and over and over again every time that she gives up one food that sweets do not cause obesity. She gave up the fudge for a year and didn't lose an ounce!

Dr. Andrew Moulden has done the research that connects vaccines and autism. You can watch his videos on youtube or his website brainguardmd. All vaccines cause ministrokes.

Also many autistic children have severe food allergies which is also caused by vaccinations! There is a new book out "The History of the Peanut Allergy Epidemic" by Heather Fraser. She found some interesting facts:

The WHO and FDA decided that refined peanut oil is GRAS and does not have to be listed on the package insert of pharmaceuticals. If you want to know if peanut oil is an ingredient in a vaccine, you are not entitled to know because it is a protected trade secret.

Peanut allergy is epidemic among our vaccinated children. 1 in 125 have a SEVERE peanut allergy which means they could die if they smell peanuts.

I want full disclosure of all ingredients on all pharmaceutical products... how about you?

Stan said...

altoids says:

"I want full disclosure of all ingredients on all pharmaceutical products... how about you?"

I agree totally. This requirement is long overdue, PARTICULARLY because the pharma industry put various food proteins in vaccines which caused the epidemic of allergies we have today (the body's immune system being sensitized to the ingredients of the vaccines in its inflammatory reaction to them).

Heather Fraser is to be congratulated on her new book. Every autism-community website should check it out: she nails the start of a huge increase in allergies to the same time period - the late 80s on - that the ASD community identifies as the start of a huge increase in their numbers, coinciding with the more than 3 times increase in vaccines on the schedule. This is circumstantial evidence of a high order, and needs serious follow-up. In the meantime, it is further ammunition for the safer-vaccines crowd to make their case with. These things are far from the wondrous medical modality that they are painted as. The public can follow that argument, if it is broached with clarity, and persistence.

Otto von Kotzebue said...


Two things we know for sure:

1. Autism is awful.

2. Vaccines don't cause it.

Please feel free to comment there if you have ANY evidence that vaccines cause autism that could not equally apply to cucumbers.



Ginger Taylor said...


You can start with the forty or so studies on this page:

None of which are cucumber based.

If you have specific reasoning as to why you disbelive a link, please let me know so I can offer you more specific information.

Stan said...

"Gee, Otto, and all these hundreds of pages of books and articles and papers and case histories and study rebuttals and such that are telling me that there is serious concern about and evidence for a major downside to vaccines - it's all just nonsense because you tell me it is?

Thanks for setting me straight. What a relief. I can get on with the rest of my life now. What, me worry? Naw. Life is precisely what our masters tell us it is. If you don't believe it, just ask them."

Just posted this message over on Otto's blog.

Why should we have to do his work for him? If he were really interested in finding out what the argument is, he could easily do so. If he were really interested. Otherwise, it's a waste of precious time to engage in back-and-forth with such a closed-minded person. It appears to be a tactic of theirs. Let'em go. We have more important work to do.

David said...

A must see for families who have experience with Aspergers.

damonna said...

I was wondering something. From my knowledge, Maryland does not have a philosophical exemption. Has this changed recently? I was looking into it because my husband has mentioned moving there and I told him NO. The vaccine laws do have an impact on where I am willing to move. Obviously. I don't want to deal with it. But if there is something I don't know, please let me know so I can add it into my equation.
NVIC shows it as medical and religious only.

Ginger Taylor said...


I thought there was one, but perhaps I am wrong.

You want to talk to the Dow's at

They can fill you in on all things vaccination and Maryland.

ciaparker2 said...

To Rory:
You are misinformed on many levels. German measles is very mild for the person who has it, and often is not even noticed. It is dangerous if a pregnant woman in the first months of pregnancy gets it, as it can sometimes damage the fetus. I had classic measles when I was six, at that time everyone got it, and I and all the other children in my first grade class were very sick for two weeks, high fever, rash, cough, red, sensitive eyes, and then we got well, permanent immunity for the rest of our lives. A lot better than a lifetime of disability from reacting to the MMR. All the people who got mumps in the Midwest five years ago? Did you notice that none of them died, they all got well? Again, better than autism from the MMR.
My daughter reacted to the hep-B vaccine when she was hours old (which I had told the doctor a month before that I did not want her to get, because I had read it caused autism). They didn't ask me, they just gave it to her, and she screamed nonstop, day and night, four days and four nights, Tuesday night to Saturday night. No one had told me the signs of a vaccine reaction, the doctor thought it must be colic even though colic never occurs in the first week of life. It was encephalitis caused by the vaccine, and now she's autistic. The package insert of every vaccine says that encephalitis and autism are possible adverse reactions which may be caused by the vaccine. Congress advised in 1999 that a moratorium be placed on the use of the hep-B vaccine because it was so dangerous, but in May 2000, a year LATER, that's what they gave my daughter!