October 21, 2005

New Jersey Baby Dies After Being Vaccinated

Earlier this year an autistic child died during Chelation, spurring critics to characterize it dangerous and call for the practice to cease.

Will they have the same reaction to this little boy's death?

Infant dies at DYFS office after shot
Posted by the Asbury Park Press on 10/21/05

NEWARK — An infant died Thursday after being stricken at a downtown office of the state child welfare agency, police said.

The month-old boy, who has been in foster care since birth, had just arrived about noon at an office of the state Division of Youth and Family Services from a doctor's visit. He had received immunizations at the doctor's office, said DYFS spokesman Andy Williams.

"When the aide arrived to bring the baby upstairs, he noticed he was having trouble breathing and there was blood in his nose," Williams said.

The aide brought the child to the office nurse, who began resuscitation efforts while emergency medical workers were called. The baby was pronounced dead at 12:46 p.m., Williams said.

"It appears the baby had a reaction to an immunization," Williams said.


Kev said...

Will they have the same reaction to this little boy's death?

Of course not. Everyone knows there are sometimes often adverse reactions to jabs.

However, chelation is not in the same league. The boy's death was totally unecessary as chelation is not a viable treatment for autism. So on one hand we have an accidental death and on the other hand we have a totally unecessary death which, if the US justic system is fair, Dr Kerry will at least be charged with manslaughter for.

Wade Rankin said...

Leaving aside the issue of who bears the burden of proof on the issue, the evidence neither proves nor disproves the efficacy of chelation in treating autism. Before that proof -- either of the benefits of chelation or the role of mercury or other metals in triggering autistic symptoms -- comes in, we can only weigh potential benefits against known risks. The Pennsylvania tragedy notwithstanding, properly conducted chelation still seems safer than the average vaccination. Obviously, some vaccinations are still worth the risk because of the potential benefit. All we are saying is that our decision-making process regarding chelation should be afforded the same respect as the decisions we make regarding vaccination.